X‑Originating‑IP: [207.64.156.2]

From: John DeBusk <atomicvet@xxxx.com>

To: joyeria@walrus.com

Subject: Atomic Tests

Date: Thu, 21 Jan 1999 15:15:44 PST

 

Hi Joy,

 

Thanks for your email. 

 

My military unit was the first the government used as guinea pigs at the

Nevada Test Site when it opened in the early 1950s.  We knew we were

being "fried off" there by the radiation, but we were young and thought

we were invincible. Because the early bombs were very dirty, not all the

plutonium fissioned, so when detonated, and the mushroom cloud formed,

it sucked up much of the radioactive particles, the wind carried the

fallout across the U.S., causing many people to contract cancer of

various types.  The government denied there was ever any risk involved

with the atomic tests.  I would [think] the Japanese would have a different

view, since thousands died at Hiroshima and Nagasaki.  Hiroshima and

Nagasaki was a great U.S. experiment too, after all we spent two billion

dollars on the atomic bomb, and General L. Groves and the scientists at

Los Alamos had an urge to try it out on some one. The Japanese were

about to surrender and time was running out for the big test.

 

The U.S. killed women and children in Hiroshima and Nagasaki in Japan,

then started in the United States doing the same thing, but they didn't

care because they had their new toy called the "A‑Bomb," they felt a

need to develop larger and larger bombs and set them off as frequently

as time would allow.

 

This is what happened to us, wife and I: After being in the nuclear

tests, I was discharged in November of 1953, I returned home to Texas

and married my high‑school sweetheart.  We worked and saved so that we

could provide for our children when they came along.  In 1958 we had our

first child, a daughter.  My wife and I had picked out a name, Debbie

Lynn DeBusk.  We had picked out everything we would need for the baby,

cloths, a bed, etc. Our daughter was born with birth defects and only

lived for 4 days, caused by the radiation I was exposed to in Nevada in

1951...That's my story, and why I have the web site.  

   

Best regards,

 

John DeBusk

Atomic Veterans Web Page

 

 

back to Buster-Jangle